20 is Plenty in Sandford

This webpage has been set up in response to the traffic situation in Sandford,and the expected substantial increase in traffic over the next few years, with the large number of housing developments in the area, and the Banwell Bypass. '20 is Plenty' is a national campaign to bring 30mph limits down to 20 mph limits, which has been proved to have many benefits, especially for communities. Bath, BANES, and recently Oxford Councils have voted to bring in default 20 mph speed limits. It is hoped that North Somerset Council will bring in a 20mph speed limit policy.

20's Plenty for Us is a 'not for profit' organisation and now have nearly 500 local campaigns around the country and beyond. They campaign for 20mph to become the default speed limit on residential and urban streets.

Background information about UK local authorities and other countries who have adopted a 20mph speed limit policy can be found at the bottom of this page.

Banwell Bypass presentation
The following slides were presented by North Somerset Council at the Parish Assembly on 12th April.

The Banwell Bypass is going ahead
Banwell Bypass Possible Routes
North Somerset Council has been given £97 million from the government Housing Infrastructure Fund to fund a new School at Locking, and the Banwell bypass, with improvement work on roads near Banwell. This is in connection with the planned large housing developments near Banwell, originally planned as a 1,900 dwelling 'garden village'. Planning for the all work can now begin.

Banwell Bypass traffic will come through Sandford on the already busy A368
The 3 potential routes for the bypass are shown on the plan below (1) . All of these will bring the traffic from the new housing development, plus what is known as 'induced traffic', the traffic generated when new roads and roundabouts are built, into Sandford on the A368. The A368 s already busy, used by pedestrians and cyclists, visitors to the Strawberry Line, horse riders, and all kinds of motor traffic including HGVs. To give an idea of just how busy, there are the Parish Council VAS readlings, and also formal surveys, shown below also, as part of the work done by Sandford Neighbourhood Group for the Aurora Inquiry in April 2019. (2)

Majority of Sandford residents support traffic calming and a 20mph limit
SNG carried out a Sandford survey in March 2017, following the decision granting permission for the Strongvox estate, when residents gave their views about traffic calming and a possible 20mph limit in the village, excerpt below(3) Comments asking for provision for traffic calming in Sandford were also made in response to the West of England consultation on the Joint Transport Plan.

North Somerset Council looks for funding for infrastructure
The West of England Joint Spatial Plan, and the concurrent Joint Transport Plan are no longer proceeding. North Somerset Council,, under the last administration, opted out of a share in the £40 million funding for the West of England partnership. This is now shared by Bristol, BANES and S. Gloucester, who are forging ahead with infrastructure plans. Comparatively, our Council is on its own, and has been honest about its lack of funds in its recent consultations on the new Local Plan and Active Travel Strategy, walking and cycling.

The adverse impact of the Banwell Bypass traffic on Sandford
For Sandford, the impending traffic situation looks fairly dire. Banwell's longstanding congestion problem will be transferred down the road to Sandford , plus the traffic from 1,900 new houses, plus induced traffic from the new road.

What are we doing to improve the situation?
We are hoping for the support of our Parish Council and District Councillors to ensure that proper provision will be made from the Housing Infrastructure Fund money to ensure Sandford's roads are safer and less congested. Rising traffic levels in Sandford are already adversely affecting our community. Increased HGV traffic, including from the National Grid works at Towerhead is an added concern.

Sandford villagers have joined the ' 20 is Plenty for Us' campaign, which has been set up to promote 30mph limits being brought down to 20mph. This is a national campaign, and has taken off internationally as well, as the benefits have become obvious through the schemes already in place. For answers to frequently asked questions, and useful information about how other communities have campaigned successfully to get 30mph limits lowered to 20mph, please go to www.20splenty.org/

Residents are asked to share dashcam footage or their own accounts of any traffic incidents, to help show the evolving traffic situation in Sandford. .. These can be sent to sandford@20splentyforus.org.uk

What else can we do to improve the situation?
Without separate funding provision under a new road scheme like the Banwell Bypass, villages like Winscombe and Sandford have to apply through the Parish Council to North Somerset Council to be considered for a new speed limit scheme, or lower speed zone . The costs are mainly paid for out of the Parish precept, and in Winscombe and Sandford's case, this would amount to around £20,000, or £4 a head for both Winscombe and Sandford. For the Parish Council, it will mean looking at the facts and consulting with all parishioners before deciding on a plan.

Another problem is that North Somerset Council aims to fulfil only two 20mph road schemes a year. So far, Backwell and Wrington have successfully applied for a 20mph scheme, and Yatton is now applying.

This contrasts with the situation in Bristol, where large 20mph limits have already been brought in by the City Council to reduce road accidents, increase walking and cycling, and improve local communities.

Bath and North East Somerset Council have also put 20mph limits in force, and are planning to extend them. The 20 mph limit schemes have been found to work, and most residents are in favour.

5 British Social Attitude Surveys between 2006 and 2018 have showed that 70% of the public say 20mph is the correct speed limit for residential roads. A 20mph limit area offers safer roads, encouraging more walking and cycling, cleaner air, less carbon emissions, and better health, making neighbourhoods more 'liveable', as well as increasing footfall for local traders and businesses.

Studies show that 20mph limits, even if not fully complied with, have an effect of lowering speeds overall.

Is acting together with other parishes a better way forward?

North Somerset Council support for a default 20 mph speed limit
One suggestion is for residents, parishes and town councils to get together to support North Somerset Council in a new policy decision to bring in a default 20mph speed limit in areas which currently have a 30mph speed limit. This would have major cost advantages, meaning that parish and town councils do not have to fund expensive traffic studies, for the 20mph scheme which has already been proved to work in other areas in the country. Government policy prioritising cycling and walking is set out in a new guidance document for local authorities, Local Transport Note LTN 1/20.

LTN 1/20 means many local authorities will have to adopt more ambitious policies to make roads safer, in line with the guidance.

The Council have pledged to prioritise active travel, cycling and walking, in their new Active Travel Strategy, and to tackle the climate emergency by cutting emissions, including emissions from traffic, so a new deault 20mph speed limit would greatly support those pledges.


Traffic in Sandford
Station Road
Station Road
Station Road Junction with Nye Road
Station Road Junction with Nye Road
Station Road Junction with Nye Road
Station Road Junction with Hill Road
Station Road Junction with Hill Road
Greenhill Road
Greenhill Road
Greenhill Road
Greenhill Road
Greenhill Road
Greenhill Road
Greenhill Road
Greenhill Road
Greenhill Road
Greenhill Road
Hill Road
Nye Road
Nye Road
Nye Road
Nye Road
Nye Road


traffic around Greenhill Road / Station Road / Nye Road / Hill Road junction February 2019



Traffic around Sandford Primary School July 2016

Local authorities and countries which have adopted a 20mph speed limit, or which are adopting one now

Already over 20m people live in local authorities in the UK which are adopting or have adopted this policy. This includes Wales where the First Minister has set up a Task Group to implement a 20mph national default for residential roads. This has reported and the initiative gained cross-party support in the Senedd (Welsh Parliament).

In February 2020 Global Ministers mandated 20mph or 30km/h speed limits wherever cyclists or pedestrians mix with motor vehicles with exceptions only where strong evidence exists that higher speeds are safe. This was endorsed in August 2020 by the General Assembly of the United Nations.

Most importantly, through democratic debate those communities have decided that "20's Plenty Where People Live". And it is those same communities who have then changed their behaviour to drive slower in residential streets and where people walk and cycle.